IL Sky WX Info


Here's some thing's to read.
Severe Weather season is just starting
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Various Winter Weather Information ...

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Here's some pics of the storm coming in.
West Frankfort
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Nathan Ruff shared a link to the group: Illinois Sky Weather Information. ...

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For anyone on Illinois Sky Weather Information.
If you didn't know I have another page.
Illinois Skywatch
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Photos from Nathan Ruff's post ...

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MAY 8, 2009 DERECHO IN SOUTHERN ILLINOIS

A widespread damaging wind event, known as a Derecho, with isolated embedded tornadoes occurred in southern Illinois and parts of southeast Missouri. Peak wind gusts were measured over 80 mph at Marion and Carbondale, IL. The peak gust recorded by the automated system at the Carbondale airport was 81 mph before the system failed. An observer at the airport visually observed a separate anemometer located on the rooftop reach 106 mph. The automated system measured a sustained wind of 68 mph before failing. Extensive tree and power line damage occurred in the Murphysboro, Carbondale, and Marion areas of southern Illinois and Perry and Bollinger Counties of southeast Missouri. Numerous structures were damaged in the Marion, Carbondale, and Murphysboro areas. While injuries were reported, an approximate count was not available. One fatality occurred in Jackson County when a tree fell on a home, causing an elderly man to fall to his death. State disaster declarations were granted for Jackson, Williamson, and Franklin Counties in Illinois. Curfews and states of emergency were declared locally. The Williamson County airport near Marion reported a peak gust of 86 mph. There was extensive damage at the airport, including hangar buildings. Hail was around 2 inches in diameter in some areas. There was a report of windows broken out of vehicles on the east side of Carbondale. The storm continued into western Kentucky producing golf ball size hail in Marion Kentucky. Several communities in southeast Missouri had received strong winds and microbursts, with winds up to 90 MPH occurring in Ripley County.
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These are pictures from Franklin county Illinois Wednesday evening. It's a shelf cloud. The leading edge of the storm ...

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Nathan Ruff shared Nick Hausen WSIL - TV's video to the group: Illinois Sky Weather Information. ...

A little explainer video on shelf clouds. We're always thrilled to have your reports coming in, however, it's important that those reports are accurate. Many viewers sending photos of what they called wall clouds, but were actually shelf clouds. Wall clouds can create tornadoes, shelf clouds do not.

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Here's a more readable severe weather outlook chart ...

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Photos from Nathan Ruff's post ...

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FROM WEATHER SCOOP

Severe Weather Risks
The level of categorical risk in the Day 1-3 Convective Outlooks is derived from probability forecasts of tornadoes, damaging winds, and large hail on Day 1, and a combined severe weather risk on Days 2 and 3.

TSTM (light green) - General or non-severe thunderstorms - Delineates, to the right of a line, where a 10% or greater probability of thunderstorms is forecast during the valid period.

1-MRGL (dark green) - Marginal risk - An area of severe storms of either limited organization and longevity, or very low coverage and marginal intensity.

2-SLGT (yellow) - Slight risk - An area of organized severe storms, which is not widespread in coverage with varying levels of intensity.

3-ENH (orange) - Enhanced risk - An area of greater (relative to Slight risk) severe storm coverage with varying levels of intensity.

4-MDT (red) - Moderate risk - An area where widespread severe weather with several tornadoes and/or numerous severe thunderstorms is likely, some of which should be intense. This risk is usually reserved for days with several supercells producing intense tornadoes and/or very large hail, or an intense squall line with widespread damaging winds.

5-HIGH (magenta) - High risk - An area where a severe weather outbreak is expected from either numerous intense and long-tracked tornadoes or a long-lived derecho-producing thunderstorm complex that produces hurricane-force wind gusts and widespread damage. This risk is reserved for when high confidence exists in widespread coverage of severe weather with embedded instances of extreme severe (i.e., violent tornadoes or very damaging convective wind events).
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